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  Therapeutic Play; A Way to Enhance Parent-Child Relationships
By Michael Milgraum

(Article published in the Prince George’s Sentinel, August 5th 2004)

Sam is a thirteen-year-old autistic child, whom I saw for psychotherapy over the course of two years.  When Sam began working with me, he had little interest in interacting with me or his peers.  In school he would deliberately misbehave, so that he could be sent to time-out, where he could be free of human contact for a period of time.  He would engage in short verbal interchanges, when pressed to do so, but only answered what was asked, and clearly derived no pleasure from the interchange.

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Divorce: Individual and Communal Responses to a Difficult Problem
By Michael Milgraum

(This article is a modification of an article published in the Where, What, When, February 2000)

When one member of a couple announces that he or she wants to divorce, there is usually already a high level of conflict within the marriage.  If the divorce is handled poorly, this conflict expands and grows like a cancer, so that many innocent victims can be consumed in its wake.  Children, the other spouse, extended family, and friends may be targeted in a cycle of blame, attack and revenge.  The psychological research indicates that pronounced conflict between parents is a more powerful predictor of children’s adjustment than whether the parents are married or divorced.  Although divorce is invariably a painful process, it is not necessarily destructive of the children’s wellbeing, as long as the parents are able to focus on compromise and conflict resolution, rather than mutual revenge.  Below I present a very condensed psychological primer on the divorce process, as well as some suggestions for how to minimize the suffering for all involved.

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Inattention is not Always Attention Deficit Disorder
By Michael Milgraum

(Article published in the Prince George’s Sentinel, July 1st, 2004)

Parents frequently ask me, “Does my child have ADD? [Attention Deficit Disorder].”  My response generally is that inattention is like a fever; it can have many causes and thorough questioning and examination are needed to determine the underlying disorder.   Below I discuss some of the conditions that could cause an attention problem.

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